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The nature of sanctions: the case of Morocco's Equity and Reconciliation Commission

30-06-2008 Article, International Review of the Red Cross, No. 870, by Pierre Hazan

Using the case of Morocco’s Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an example, this article analyses how transitional justice is by definition the place where ethics and reasons of State, the will to see justice done and the balance of power meet. Therein lie both the strength and ambiguity of transitional justice.

   

Pierre Hazan is consultant for the UN High Commission for Human Rights and a writer on international affairs. 
 
Abstract 
Using the case of Morocco’s Equity and Reconciliation Commission as an example, this article analyses how transitional justice is by definition the place where ethics and reasons of state, the will to see justice done and the balance of power meet. Therein lie both the strength and the ambiguity of transitional justice. The sanction-free approach adopted in the specific case of Morocco limited the Commission’s effectiveness by not establishing the truth about past human rights violations or creating an environment conducive to greater democratic reform.


 
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