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Ireland: Conference on contemporary challenges in international humanitarian law

19-09-2013 Feature

On 17 October 2013, our colleagues at the Irish Red Cross host a conference on ‘Contemporary Challenges in International Humanitarian Law’.  It will bring together experienced and emerging legal practitioners, academics, partners and students to explore the challenges to IHL posed by the changing nature of modern conflict.

In the year when the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement marks 150 years since its creation there is renewed focus on how international humanitarian law (IHL) protects civilians and the sick and injured in armed conflict.

During this time States have drafted, signed and implemented a number of treaties including the Geneva Conventions, Convention on Cluster Munitions and most recently the Arms Trade Treaty.

Yet the nature of armed conflict is constantly evolving. New technologies develop and new trends emerge, presenting fresh challenges for those concerned with ensuring law adequately protects all civilians and the victims of conflict.

The Irish Red Cross, with support from the ICRC, is holding a one conference to highlight the most pressing challenges facing international humanitarian law. By bringing together eminent lawyers, academics and humanitarian professionals, the discussions will shine a fresh light on whether and how IHL should adapt to the changing shape of modern warfare.  


The conference

The conference will be held from 09.15 - 17.00 in the Royal Irish Academy, Dawson Street, Dublin 2 on Thursday 17 October 2013.  RIA is located in the centre of Dublin City and is easily accessible by public transport.  Please note parking is not available at the venue.

All questions with respect to speakers, the conference location, accommodation, parking and other logistics should be addressed to: Louise Sarsfield Collins, IHL Dissemination Officer.

Contact


Louise Sarsfield Collins
Email: lscollins@redcross.ie
Telephone: +353 1 6424647


Photos

Attacks on ambulances, doctors and nurses leave conflict victims without the care they need. Should the law be changed to give healthcare providers better protection?  

Attacks on ambulances, doctors and nurses leave conflict victims without the care they need. Should the law be changed to give healthcare providers better protection?
© ICRC / J Mohr