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Council of Delegates 2001: Resolution 11

14-11-2001 Resolution

Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict

Council of Delegates of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, Geneva, Switzerland, 11 - 14 November 2001

The Council of Delegates,

deeply alarmed at the destruction of monuments, works of art, manuscripts and books and other objects of cultural property during armed conflicts,

recognising that cultural property, monuments and cultural heritage are essential elements of the identity of peoples, the importance of their preservation as part of the cultural heritage of the world and as part of promoting mutual understanding and peace, and the protection afforded to cultural property under criminal law,

noting that protection of cultural property during armed conflicts is enhanced by adherence to the relevant rules of international humanitarian law, in particular, the 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict and its two Protocols of 1954 and 1999,

recalling the Plan of Action of the 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent and relevant resolutions of earlier International Conferences which call upon States to consider becoming party to relevant treaties concluded since the adoption of the 1949 Geneva Conventions to enhance the universal character of international humanitarian law,

recognising that many of the rules contained in the 1954 Hague Convention and its two Protocols of 1954 and 1999 require implementation in peacetime in order to be effective during situations of armed conflict,

recalling the special role of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and of National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (National Societies) in the promotion, dissemination and implementation of international humanitarian law,

 

1. notes with appreciation the increasing role of the ICRC, in co-operation with UNESCO, in encouraging ratification and implementation of the Hague Convention and its Protocols;

2. encourages National Societies to include the Hague Convention and its Protocols in their activities to promote, disseminate and implement international humanitarian law, either on their own initiative or in cooperation with their governments;

3. invites the States that have not yet done so to become party to the relevant treaties concluded since the 1949 Geneva Conventions, in particular the 1954 Hague Convention and its two Protocols, with a view to strengthening the universality of international humanitarian law.