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Council of Delegates 1995: Resolution 2

02-12-1995 Resolution

Red Cross and Red Crescent action for peace

Council of Delegates of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, Geneva, Switzerland, 1 - 2 December 1995

The Council of Delegates,

having considered the final report of the Commission on the Red Cross, Red Crescent and Peace on its activities since the 1991 session of the Council of Delegates in Budapest, and the Commission's recommendations,

 recalling all the resolutions adopted and the efforts made to promote peace, in particular the " Programme of Action of the Red Cross as a Factor of Peace " and the " Fundamental Guidelines for the Contribution of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement to a True Peace in the World " , adopted respectively by the World Red Cross Conference on Peace (Belgrade, 1975) and the Second World Red Cross Conference on Peace (Aaland Stockholm, 1984),

 reaffirming the importance of the preamble to the Statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, which recalls the Movement's definition of peace and declares that " by its humanitarian work and the dissemination of its ideals, the Movement promotes a lasting peace, which is not simply the absence of war, but is a dynamic process of co-operation among all States and peoples, co-operation founded on respect for freedom, independence, national sovereignty, equality, human rights, as well as on a fair and equitable distribution of resources to meet the needs of peoples " ,

 aware of the influence that the Movement, which upholds and propagates the values of tolerance, solidarity and dialogue, wields or can wield through its activities to reduce tension and prevent armed conflicts, thereby contributing to a climate conducive to peace,

 stressing the need for the Movement to pursue its work in this regard and for the Movement's contribution to peace to be regularly re-examined in the light of constant changes in the present international situation and the new challenges to humanitarian action resulting from the increase in the number of both internal and international conflicts and the concomitant sharp rise in violations of the fundamental rights of the individual,

1.  takes note of the final report of the Commission and thanks it for its work and its contribution to the Movement's action for peace;

2.  reaffirms the importance of implementing the resolutions adopted to promote peace and respect for human rights on the basis of the work and recommendations made by the Commission on the Red Cross, Red Crescent and Peace;

3.  requests the National Societies, the ICRC and the International Federation, in cooperation with the Henry Dunant Institute, to pursue implementation of the " Programme of Action of the Red Cross and Red Crescent as a Factor of Peace " , and of the " Fundamental Guidelines for the Contribution of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement to a True Peace in the World " ;

4.  calls upon all components of the Movement to undertake specific actions to strengthen understanding between different cultures and ethnic, social, cultural and religious groups with a view to reducing tension and preventing conflict, in conformity with the study on minorities and conflict prevention presented by the Henry Dunant Institute;

5.  strongly recommends the implementation of the proposals submitted by the Commission regarding children and respect for their rights, and supports in particular the pursuit of efforts in favour of children in armed conflicts and street children;

6.  recommends, in particular, that National Societies draw the attention of their respective governments to the need for measures to be adopted nationally in order to punish the especially shocking abuse of children's rights constituted by child prostitution, particularly in the form that goes by the regrettable name of " international sex tourism " ;

7.  stresses and reaffirms the importance of keeping issues linked to examination of the Movement's contribution to peace, particularly through activities conducive to reducing tension and preventing conflict, at the centre of the Movement's concerns;

8.  desires that the Movement's role and attitude concerning the problem of arms transfers be studied and clarified;

9.  decides to regularly include in its agenda an item on the promotion of activities contributing to peace and respect for human rights, in order to reassert the need for particular attention to be paid to these matters during its discussions, and recommends that its discussions on these issues be prepared by the Standing Commission or an ad hoc body that the latter may set up.