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International Review of the Red Cross, 2009, No. 876 – International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent

 

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Texts published by the Review reflect the views of the author alone and not necessarily those of the ICRC or of the Review. Only texts bearing an ICRC signature may be ascribed to the institution.

Issue No. 876 - 2009

Theme - International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent

Download pdfPDF 4 MB Ever since it was first held in 1867, the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has been a unique forum for discussing issues of humanitarian concerns with the Movement of the Red Cross and Red Crescent and the States. By reaffirming the responsibility of all States to respect and ensure respect for international humanitarian law, the Conference regularly explores new challenges and trends as observed in contemporary armed conflicts.

Table of contents

Editorial

International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent

  • Interview with Ambassador Masood Khan
    Masood Khan has been Pakistan's Ambassador to the People's Republic of China since September 2008. In 2009, he was promoted to the highest rank of Federal Secretary in Pakistan’s civil service. Over the years, he has acquired expertise in multilateral diplomacy, security and disarmament issues, human rights, humanitarian diplomacy and social development. He has also specialized in international conferences, having held several leadership positions.
  • The International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent – challenges, key issues and achievements
    François Bugnion
    Since the constituent Conference in October 1863, which gave birth to the Red Cross, the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent has met on thirty occasions. What contribution has the Conference made to the development of international humanitarian law and humanitarian action? What are the main challenges that the Conference has had to face? Where has it succeeded and where has it failed?
  • The importance of the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent to National Societies: fundamental in theory and in practice
    Michael Meyer
    In practice, not all National Societies have taken full advantage of the opportunities provided by the International Conference for interaction and relationship-building with their own authorities. Practical ways are suggested to help National Societies participate more actively in the Conference and to use it to good benefit before and afterwards.
  • Participation of states in the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent and assemblies of other international organizations
    Deborah Casalin and Christopher Lamb
    The International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent (“International Conference”) is one of the few international fora in which governments take part on an equal footing with other entities. This article provides an overview of the models for participation in the assemblies of other international organizations, and how problematic cases have been dealt with in various fora.
  • The emblem that cried wolf: ICRC study on the use of the emblems
    Edith Lafontaine and Baptiste Rolle
    This article presents the Emblem Study's origin and objectives, and explains the structure and the methodology followed in its preparation. Particular emphasis is put on the need to avoid diluting the protective value of the emblems by maintaining a distinction between those entitled to use the emblems, their partners and other actors in the humanitarian field.

Selected articles on international humanitarian law

  • Humanitarians and their moral stance in war: the underlying values
    Eva Wartel
    In this article the moral values underlying humanitarian principles are analysed. What were the original moral values, have they changed and to what extent are they in danger today? Has humanity itself become an instrumental value?
  • Military intervention for humanitarian purposes: does the Responsibility to Protect doctrine advance the legality of the use of force for humanitarian ends?
    Eve Massingham
    The Responsibility to Protect is being touted as a new approach to protecting populations from mass atrocities. This paper specifically addresses the evolution of the legality of humanitarian intervention and looks at whether the Responsibility to Protect doctrine advances the legality of the use of force for humanitarian ends.
  • What does “intent to destroy” in genocide mean?
    Kai Ambos
    The prevailing view in the case-law interprets the respective “intent to destroy” requirement as a special or specific intent (dolus specialis) stressing its volitional or purpose-based tendency. A historical, literal, systematic and teleological interpretation of the “intent to destroy” requirement, taking into account the particular structure of the genocide offence and the meaning of “intent” in comparative law, reveals that the traditional view can no longer be maintained.

Reports and documents

Books and articles