Marco Sassòli

Professor

Marco Sassòli is Director of the Department of International Law and International Organization and Professor of International Law at the University of Geneva, and Associate Professor at the Université Laval and the University of Québec in Montreal, Canada; he is also a member of the Editorial Board of the International Review of the Red Cross.


  • Is the law of occupation applicable to the invasion phase?

    Three experts in the field of occupation law – Marten Zwanenburg, Michael Bothe, and Marco Sassòli – have agreed to participate in a debate on whether or not the law of occupation could already be applied during the invasion phase, and to defend three approaches.

  • Debate: Should the obligations of states and armed groups under international humanitarian law really be equal?

    Debate: Should the obligations of states and armed groups under international humanitarian law really be equal?

  • The relationship between international humanitarian and human rights law where it matters: admissible killing and internment of fighters in non-international armed conflicts

    The article explores the relationship between international humanitarian and human rights law during non-international armed conflict. It seeks to answer two questions: First, according to which branch of law may a member of an armed group be attacked and killed? Second, may a captured member of an armed force or group be detained similarly to a prisoner of war in international armed conflicts or as prescribed by human rights? Through application of the lex specialis principle, this article discusses possible answers to these questions.

  • The ICRC and the missing

    This article describes humanitarian issues and dilemmas faced by the ICRC in dealing with persons unaccounted for during and after armed co nflict. It gives a short overview of the relevant rules of international humanitarian law and emphasizes the respect of legal obligations to prevent disappearance and separation and to alleviate the plight of families of missing persons. Best practice in the field of conflict-related disappearances would be respect of the law. Raising awareness of international humanitarian law, cooperating with the belligerents, assisting them to respect their obligations and acting as neutral intermediary between them in view of facilitating compliance are the main functions of the ICRC in this regard. As belligerents often do not respect or sometimes even distort their obligations, the institution frequently has to substitute itself in fulfilling their duties. The article shows practical examples and proposes systematisation and development of ICRC activities related to the missing issue.