The right to the truth in international law: fact or fiction?

This article unpacks the notion of the right to the truth and tests the normative strength of the concept against the practice of states and international bodies. It also considers some of the practical implications of turning “truth” into a legal right, particularly from the criminal law perspective.

About the author

Yasmin Naqvi
Immediate Office of the Registrar of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals

Dr Yasmin Naqvi is an international lawyer currently serving as Legal Officer in the Immediate Office of the Registrar of the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals. She previously worked for the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the International Criminal Court, the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Graduate Institute of International Studies, and the International Committee of the Red Cross. Dr Naqvi holds a PhD and a Master’s degree in public international law from the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, and BA and LLB (Honours) degrees from the University of Tasmania, Australia. She is a legal practitioner of the Supreme Court of Tasmania.