Violence against health care must end

 

Violence against patients and health-care workers is one of the most crucial yet overlooked humanitarian issues today. The Health Care in Danger project is a Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement initiative aiming to improve security and delivery of impartial and efficient health care in armed conflict and other emergencies.
All documents on Health Care in Danger.

Towards a solution : Health Care in Danger expert consultations, seminars and other high level meetings

As part of the Health Care in Danger project, policymakers, academics, medics, weapon bearers and civil society gather to develop practical recommendations to improve safe access to health care. Several expert consultations have taken place since 2012.

Health care and violence: The need for effective protection

Position paper prepared on occasion of the high level panel debate on “Health Care and violence:the need for effective protection ” at the 69th session of the UN General Assembly. New Yor k, 25 September 2014.

  • African Union: Seminar on protection of health services

    The African Union (AU) Commission and the ICRC jointly held a seminar in Addis Ababa on 22 October on the protection of health services in situations of armed conflict and other emergencies.

  • Australia: Ways forward to protect health care

    How can the international community better protect health care providers and patients in the midst of war and emergencies? This was the topic discussed at a special event, Health Care in Danger: the way forward, co-hosted by the ICRC and Australian Red Cross in Canberra on September 24.

  • World humanitarian day - Protection of humanitarian workers

    World humanitarian day 2014 - Statement by Mr Peter Maurer, President of the International Committee of the Red Cross, United Nations Security Council, Geneva

  • Pretoria: Experts tackle security of health-care facilities

    As part of the ICRC-led Health Care in Danger project, renowned experts and field practitioners work to improve safety of health-care delivery in armed conflict and other emergencies. Last April they tackled the security of health-care facilities. This video offers a first glimpse of their recommendations.

  • Pretoria Workshop: Ensuring safety of health facilities

    Violence against health-care facilities, including bombing, shooting and looting, is a major humanitarian issue leading to lack of safe access for thousands of patients. The last of the eleven Health Care in Danger workshops will gather renowned experts to discuss how to secure hospitals, health-centres and other premises in areas affected by armed conflict or other emergencies.

  • Australia: military practices expert workshop

    The ICRC together with the Australian Government are hosting an international military practices workshop focused on better protecting impartial health care in armed conflicts and other emergencies.

  • Brussels workshop: Domestic regulatory frameworks for safeguarding health care

    The issue of security for patients and for medical personnel, facilities and vehicles has been addressed in international humanitarian law since the adoption of the original Geneva Convention in 1864. Between 2008 and 2010, the ICRC recorded 655 violent events connected with health care in 16 different parts of the world.

  • Online panel discussion: The protection and safety of healthcare workers

    Join us for a livestreamed panel discussion at 12:15 - 1:15pm, Tuesday 3 December at London's Royal Society of Medicine on the protection and safety of healthcare workers.

  • London workshop: From consultation to implementation

    One of the first casualties of sustained violence and war is the health-care system itself. Too often hospitals, ambulances, doctors and nurses find themselves the direct and indirect target of attacks and at a time when their expert assistance is needed more than ever.

  • Ottawa workshop: Ensuring the safety of health facilities

    How do you keep a hospital safe in a war zone? How do you ensure that patients are able to reach hospital, that medics can manage in a stressful environment and that there is a sufficient supply of medical material, water and electricity? These are some of the questions that experts will discuss in Ottawa this week in the context of the Health Care in Danger project.

  • Mexico workshop: Ambulance and pre-hospital care in risk situations

    The ICRC-led Health Care in Danger project is involved in the organization of a number of expert workshops over four years that will examine how to improve security and delivery of effective and impartial health care in armed conflict and other emergencies. The workshop in Mexico is the first to deal specifically with reducing the risks and overcoming the challenges faced by medical transport.

  • Tehran workshop: responsibilities of National Societies to deliver safe health care in armed conflict

    Threats to health care in armed conflicts and other emergencies are widespread and affect individuals, families and communities. As part of the ICRC-led Health Care in Danger project, several expert consultations have taken place since 2012. Tehran will host a workshop focusing on the role and responsibilities of National Red Cross Red Crescent Societies to deliver safe health care in armed conflict. This will be the second event of its nature following the one held in Oslo in December 2012.

  • Cairo workshop: security of emergency health care in the field – protection begins from acceptance

    Attacks on and obstruction of health-care facilities and personnel in armed conflicts and other emergencies is a massive humanitarian problem resulting in the denial of health care to millions of people.

  • Oslo workshop: responsibilities of National Societies to deliver safe health care in armed violence

    The ICRC-led Health Care in Danger project is involved in the organization of a number of expert workshops over four years that will examine how to improve security and delivery of effective and impartial health care in armed conflict and other emergencies.

  • Cairo workshop: the challenge of protecting health care in armed violence

    Violence against patients and health staff involved in health care is one of the most serious humanitarian issues, even though it has not yet received due attention.

  • Health care in danger: first steps at London Symposium

    Kidnapped medical workers, murdered doctors, ransacked clinics, vaccinations denied to tens of thousands of children – vivid examples of health care interrupted by armed violence that galvanized a London meeting of health experts and humanitarian professionals to consider urgent action.