Protecting health care - a matter of Life & Death

26 August 2015
Protecting health care - a matter of Life & Death

In August 2011, the ICRC launched the Life&Death campaign, part of the Health Care in Danger (HCiD) project – a global initiative to improve access to health care and make its delivery safer in conflict or other emergencies.

Tracing back 4 years of work, the timeline highlights some of the milestones of the HCiD project.

Jun 2015   Four major health organisations, partners of the HCID project representing over 30 million people, adopt the "common ethical principles of health care".
       
Jun 2015   After a two-year long consultation process with armed groups, a report is published summarizing recommendations to engage armed groups for the protection of health care.
       
Feb 2015   A new manual provides States with recommendations and legislative measures to improve protection for patients and health-care workers.
       
Dec 2014   The HCiD project is discussed at the 69UNGA. Four resolutions are passed to improve the protection of health care.
       
Sept 2014   New HCiD recommendations outline how military forces can better protect health care workers and patients.
       
Aug 2014   The HCiD project is discussed at the 67 World health Assembly.
       
Nov 2013   A new report published that outlines practical steps that the authorities, the military, and also the health-care providers can take to reduce the risk for first responders.
       
May 2013    The ICRC continues to raise awareness on the human cost of violence against health care.
       
Sept 2012   A guidance document for health workers on their rights and responsibilities is published.
       
Apr 2012   The first HCiD experts' workshop is held to find solutions to violence and protect health care.
       
Dec 2011   Resolution 5 of the 31st International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is adopted stating: violence against health care is a crucial humanitarian concern to act upon.
       
Aug 2011   The ICRC 16-country study report unveils the impact of violence on the provision of and access to health care.

 

More on the project