• DRC. Saba Saba, Equateur province. During the armed violence in 2009, civilians were killed and their bodies buried in graves. A team of DRC Red Cross volunteers exhume the remains of the victims, under the gaze of the local community.
    • DRC. Saba Saba, Equateur province. During the armed violence in 2009, civilians were killed and their bodies buried in graves. A team of DRC Red Cross volunteers exhume the remains of the victims, under the gaze of the local community. The volunteers were trained by ICRC to carry out this complex task.
      © Getty Images/ICRC / Jonathan Torgovnik / cd-e-01199
  • DRC. Equateur province. DRC Red Cross volunteers transport the remains of civilians exhumed in Saba Saba.
    • DRC. Equateur province. DRC Red Cross volunteers transport the remains of civilians exhumed in Saba Saba.
      © Getty Images/ICRC / Jonathan Torgovnik / cd-e-01201
  • DRC. Saba Saba, Equateur province. Family members and neighbours mourn the death of their loved ones while volunteers of the Red Cross Society exhume the remains of the murdered civilians.

    The remains, which have been buried since 2009, were exhumed in July 2011, allowing families and relatives to provide dignified funeral ceremonies for their loved ones in their native villages.

  • DRC. Dongo, Equateur province. A 13-year-old girl who lost her leg when she was shot while fleeing her village during the armed violence in 2009.
  • DRC. Dongo town, Equateur province. A mother of five whose husband disappeared in the fighting, stands beside her house, which was destroyed during the armed violence in 2009. She now lives in one of 500 new houses built in Dongo with the help of the ICRC.
  • DRC. Equateur province. Despite very difficult access, ICRC teams make their way by canoe and on foot through waterways between the villages of Enyele and Monzaya, in order to reach the affected communities.
  • DRC. Monzaya, Equateur province. Women from the village of Monzaya make their way through the jungle to fishing ponds.

    In 2009, contested fishing rights over ponds triggered the armed violence between the residents of the villages of Enyele and Monzaya, which later spread throughout the province.

  • DRC. Monzaya village, Equateur province. Village residents in their new home, one of the 220 built by the ICRC in Monzaya. Another 500 were built in Dongo.
  • Congo. Owando. A cassava plantation infected by mosaic disease, caused by a highly destructive virus with the potential to devastate 80 per cent of a harvest.
  • Congo. Owando. An ICRC team with local volunteers from the Congolese Red Cross prepare cassava cuttings tolerant to mosaic disease, for distribution to populations in the Likouala district.
  • Congo. Brazzaville. One of the organizers of the ICRC's cassava project displays cassava cuttings tolerant to mosaic disease, to be distributed to local populations in the Likouala District.

    A team from the ICRC travelled on a pirogue down the Oubangui river on a mission to distribute the cassava cuttings, agricultural equipment and fishing materials to prevent depletion of food reserves. The team also trained the local population on planting techniques. This assistance benefited around 100,000 people in the Likouala district.  

  • Congo. Owando. An ICRC and Congolese Red Cross team loads a plane with sacks of cassava cuttings tolerant to mosaic disease. The cuttings require rapid transportation, distribution and replanting.
  • Congo, Mombenzele. A woman plants in her garden the cassava cuttings provided by the ICRC.

    With this distribution, the ICRC aimed to strengthen the economic capacity of the resident population of Likouala, to avoid depletion of commodities such as cassava and fish.  

    In collaboration with the volunteers of the Congolese Red Cross, the ICRC assisted families in five districts of the country (Btou, Enyele, Liranga, Impfondo Dongou). In addition to fishing materials and agricultural equipment, families received cassava cuttings tolerant to the viral and highly destructive mosaic disease.

  • Congo. Owando. On the road from Brazzaville to Owando, a woman sells cassava bread, a product highly appreciated in the region.
  • DRC. Dongo, Equateur province. Representatives from the ICRC are about to reunite a nine-year-old girl with her uncle.

    The girl was separated from her parents during the armed violence in 2009. The fate of her parents is still unknown. The ICRC has reunited over 200 children who were separated from their families in 2009.

  • DRC. Dongo town, Equateur province. The two communities affectedby the armed violence in 2009 have formed new football teams, allowing members of both villages to join in sports activities. The local residents are now living in relative calm.

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