11 December 2018 - 12 December 2018

Digital Risks in Situations of Armed Conflict

Responding to new vectors of vulnerability in a changing humanitarian landscape

Speakers & panellists

Nathaniel Raymond
Speaker

Nathaniel Raymond

Lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs

Charlotte Lindsey-Curtet
Speaker

Charlotte Lindsey-Curtet

ICRC Director of Digital Transformation and Data

Laurent Gisel
Speaker

Laurent Gisel

Senior Legal Adviser for the ICRC's Legal Division

Ronald J. Deibert
Speaker

Ronald J. Deibert

Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

Meg Sattler
Speaker

Meg Sattler

Global Advisor, Community Engagement, UN OCHA

Martin Searle
Speaker

Martin Searle

Associate Research Fellow, Nanyang Technological University

Heather Leson
Speaker

Heather Leson

IFRC Data Literacy Lead

Lisa Rudnick
Adviser

Lisa Rudnick

Visiting Researcher at the Human Rights Center

Joseph Guay
Adviser

Joseph Guay

Director of Research, The Do No Digital Harm (DNDH) initiative

Brittan Heller
Speaker

Brittan Heller

Affiliate, Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University

Rakesh Bharania
Speaker

Rakesh Bharania

President of Tarian Innovation

Matt Mitchell
Facilitator

Matt Mitchell

Director of Digital Safety & Privacy, Tactical Tech / Advisor, Global Journalist Security

Christopher Tuckwood
Speaker

Christopher Tuckwood

Executive Director, The Sentinel Project

About the event

You can now download the final event report for this Symposium here.

The Challenge

Digital technologies can offer many opportunities to improve the lives of conflict-affected populations.

But there is growing concern around their possible negative implications as conventional modalities of armed conflict are enhanced, transformed, or replaced by digitally-derived forms of violence, persecution and exploitation.

It is left to individuals and communities to navigate the harmful (often unintended) side-effects of the humanitarian sector's efforts to deploy emerging technologies in already fragile contexts.

The Need

Increasingly sophisticated perpetrators, new tools and forms of conflict, and heightened risk profiles for vulnerable populations, compel us to reconsider matters of humanitarian protection in the digital age.

But as yet, there is little shared clarity on the scope and nature of emerging digital threats, their associated humanitarian consequences for crisis-affected populations, and the implications for those humanitarian organisations who serve them.

How will humanitarian practice evolve to meet a rapidly shifting digital threat landscape?

Our Response

We are convening stakeholders from humanitarian agencies, civil society, governments, private sector, and academia in an effort to: 

Develop a deeper understanding about the relationship between digital risk and the protection of individuals and communities affected by situations of armed conflict, and to identify areas for cooperative action for responding more effectively and appropriately to protection needs.

This invites exploration around the principles, ethics, and (emerging) standards that guide our profession; the normative and legal frameworks designed to protect civilian populations; and/or the practices and capabilities that animate humanitarian action to meet the needs of vulnerable populations in the digital age.

The Symposium will run over a day and a half and will be organised around plenary keynotes, workshops, interactive experiences, side events, and panel discussions.

Participants can download the Conference BriefAgenda and Program, as well as a full list of Speaker Bios.

DOWNLOAD THE FINAL EVENT REPORT

 

Date & Time

11 December 2018 - 12 December 2018

Venue address

CodeNode
10 South Place, London, EC2M 7EB