Kenya: Cash assistance is putting more than just food on the table

  • Haduko has just received a cash transfer message on her mobile phone. She makes her way to a mobile money vendor to withdraw the cash. This assistance is helping people affected by drought in Kenya's Tana Delta region.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre-Yeri
  • Over a period of 3 months, Haduko and others like her will receive about $100 that will see them through the drought period.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre-Yeri
  • The assistance is sent through a mobile money service, and the receiver then makes a cash withdrawal from a mobile money vendor.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre-Yeri
  • 60-year-old Haduko (right) has seven children in her care. She can now buy enough food to feed them during the drought.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre-Yeri
  • For Millicent (left), the business owner, the cash assistance means that her business will benefit directly from an injection of money into to the local economy.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre Yeri
  • The ICRC works closely with the Kenya Red Cross Society in the implementation of the cash assistance program within Kenya's coastal region.
    CC BY-NC-ND / ICRC / Rebecca Berre Yeri
12 June 2017

When Haduko's brother died, she was left with seven children to raise. Becoming the sole provider for seven minors is a real challenge, especially for a 60-year-old woman living in the small village of Kipao, in Kenya's Tana Delta region. The village has been severely affected by the drought like so many other communities of East Africa.

The ICRC has been helping people like Haduko by providing cash assistance in areas with existing market places. Over a period of 3 months, she and others like her will receive about $100. The cash assistance is coordinated by the Kenya Red Cross and sent through a mobile money service.

For Millicent, a businesswoman in Kipao village, the cash assistance to people like Haduko means that her business will benefit directly from an injection of money into to the local economy. This helps Millicent sustain her business and feed her own family.

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